Where is the art? Donald Lawerence’s artwork, which he refers to as world’s most corrugated camera obscura, provokes a discussion of technology, art, science, and the psychology of perception. Lawerence’s camera obscura shows us that we cannot separate art from our experience of it.

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More Episodes

Ep 04: Art and Technology Ep 04: Art and Technology
Ep 03: The Gallery as a Social Space (part two) Ep 03: The Gallery as a Social Space (part two)
Ep 03: The Gallery as a Social Space (part one) Ep 03: The Gallery as a Social Space (part one)
Ep 02: Art and Human Nature Ep 02: Art and Human Nature
Ep 01: Introducing Level 2: Lichen Lab Ep 01: Introducing Level 2: Lichen Lab

Show Notes

Featured in this episode:

Donald Lawerence
Artist and researcher who created the ‘worlds most corrugated’ Camera Obscura.
Strage Tools
David Hockney's theory of optics
David Hockney argued camera obscuras and optical devices were central to much of the great art from the Renaissance period. Image source: Wikipedia.

Tim’s Vermeer

The documentary follows Tim Jenison, a Texas based inventor, as he attempts to use 17th century technology — lenses and mirrors — to develop a technique that might have been used by Vermeer, supporting a theory as extraordinary as what he discovers.

Strage Tools
Strange Tools: Art and Human Nature by Alva Noë
Philosopher, Alva Noë presents his theory of why humans make art and its role in shaping society through ‘level 2’ activities (part of the inspiration for the name of the lab).