What is Level 2: Lichen Lab? In our first episode, listeners get a tour of the ‘lab’, including the artists, academics, and ideas involved.

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More Episodes

Ep 04: Art and Technology Ep 04: Art and Technology
Ep 03: The Gallery as a Social Space (part two) Ep 03: The Gallery as a Social Space (part two)
Ep 03: The Gallery as a Social Space (part one) Ep 03: The Gallery as a Social Space (part one)
Ep 02: Art and Human Nature Ep 02: Art and Human Nature
Ep 01: Introducing Level 2: Lichen Lab Ep 01: Introducing Level 2: Lichen Lab

Show Notes

Featured in this episode:

Gunnhildur Hauksdóttir
Islandic artist who opened the episode with her reading of Lichen names.

Lisa Hirmer
Artist who lead the workshop tea-leaf reading of future disasters.

Ed Pien
Artist working on the fish kite project with high school students. 

Merrell-Ann S. Phare
Environmental lawyer specializing in water and land rights and collaborates with Ed Pien. 

Jen Budney
PhD student, curator, and editor, researching issues with art galleries understanding audiences.

Tiffany Muller-Myrdahl
Feminist geographer, who looks at urban change, marginalized communities, and social justice. 

Referenced in this episode:

Strage Tools
Strange Tools: Art and Human Nature by Alva Noë

Philosopher, Alva Noë presents his theory of why humans make art and its role in shaping society through ‘level 2’ activities (part of the inspiration for the name of the lab).

Matsutake Worlds
The Matsutake Worlds Research Group

Made up of researchers from all over the world who collectively study scientific, ecological, and commercial connections involving matsutake mushrooms.

Matsutake Worlds
Complex Social Change

A past collaboration of interdisciplinary researchers at the University of Lethbridge. The connections made in this project are a big part of the formation of Level 2: Lichen lab.

Strage Tools
Jennifer Wanner - Visual Artist

Through collage and stop-motion animated video, Jennifer Wanner explores “how both art historical constructs and scientific objective means of observing the natural world have shaped our western concept of nature.”